Captain Sir Tom Moore, wearing his war medals, giving a thumbs up gesture
Captain Sir Tom Moore, wearing his war medals, giving a thumbs up gesture
Captain Sir Thomas Moore (30 April 1920–2 February 2021) became a uniting national inspiration in a time of global crisis

It is now more than a year on after the first confirmed case of Covid-19 arrived on our shores. We have endured several national lockdowns, an unparalleled economic collapse, over 4 million cases (including myself) and over 120 thousand deaths. It is not an exaggeration to say that in terms of both economic damage and lives lost, this pandemic is a national crisis not seen since the Second World War.

Like the war, both an international and national effort has been fought to beat back this virus. International cooperation on borders, research and vaccine distribution has been crucial to fighting…


Understanding Our Differences for a Common Plan

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Those of us that want affordable housing have more that unites us than divides us

I’ve been trying to take my mind off of the Covid crisis recently. As the vaccines get rolled out we have started 2021 with a renewed optimism from a very low bar set by the events of the past 10 or 11 months. This optimism is grounded in the desire to return to normal; towards solving some of the bread-and-butter issues of the past — and in the spirit of that renewed optimism I’d like to turn attention to one problem that will be a little more prescient once the pandemic comes under control: Housing

As a liberal I often…


A series of different coloured human hands piled on top of each other, as to signify teamwork from a group of people
A series of different coloured human hands piled on top of each other, as to signify teamwork from a group of people

“I can’t help but believe that in the future we will see in the United States and throughout the Western world an increasing trend toward the next logical step, employee ownership. It is a path that befits a free people.”
— President Ronald Reagan (1987)

The old reinvention of social democracy (1945–2007)

Social democracy is a nebulous term, encompassing the political ideals of everyone from Vladimir Lenin to Tony Blair, but it has shifted and changed with time and place. Today it is used to the describe the somewhat big tent of the Western centre-left, advocating reformation of capitalism to align it with the ethical ideals of…


A white protest sign with “OK BOOMER” written in capital letters against a blurred urban background
A white protest sign with “OK BOOMER” written in capital letters against a blurred urban background

In so many ways the politics of the industrialised world has changed little from the 19th century. The big beasts of conservatism, liberalism and socialism still inform our understanding of social and cultural relations in most democracies and will continue to do so for some time. But like in previous centuries, ideologies and ideas have evolved and adapted to a changing world — new dimensions to politics that were once fringe have become central stage. The 20th century saw feminism, racial justice and green politics become mainstreamed in political discourse, we also saw longstanding and dominant ideologies such as nationalism…


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Global investment on the scale China has done in ‘normal’ times makes economic and geopolitical sense

Since the Great Recession petered out in the 2010s, analysts and commentators alike have made efforts to try to predict the next big global recession — few anticipated it would’ve come in the form of worldwide pandemic on a scale not seen for a century. Not dismissing the still increasing death toll, which has now reached an estimated 1 million worldwide, the economic consequences of the spread of the virus (and humanity’s efforts to effectively contain it) is already leaving a battered and bruised global economy, particularly for the world’s poorest, leaving a worldwide fall of GDP not seen since…


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The Prussian general and military theorist Carl von Clausewitz has a famous quote “War is politics by other means”. Beyond the collapse of peace talks between nations the same aphorism can and should be applied when local politics comes to a complete standstill and political institutions fail to adequately address grievances and deliver justice.

The failure of politics in Minneapolis, and the United States as a whole, has given people no choice but to take to the streets and attack the police head-on as the killers of George Floyd remain uncharged with his murder. …


Sinn Féin activists and politicians holding up signs that say “Housing in Crisis” and “Housing Crisis”
Sinn Féin activists and politicians holding up signs that say “Housing in Crisis” and “Housing Crisis”
The Irish housing crisis has propelled the previously fringe Sinn Féin to top of the polls

The 1992 United States presidential election introduced the political catchphrase “[it’s] the economy, stupid” — with a legacy and significance that has all but been forgotten in the haze of rapid change and confounded predictions of 21st century politics. The whole “rulebook” of political campaigning may need some updating but some old truths still hold true; what “the economy, stupid” reminds us is that a skillful politician or party can propel a dormant but transpiring crisis into a rallying vote winner. The combination of crisis with a catalyst, such as the early 90s recession, could be something to overturn an…


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The coat hanger has remained a powerful symbol of the gruesome consequences of abortion bans

I was originally pretty hesitant to write this at first because — if it isn’t obvious — I am a man. I never had, nor have any intention to have, a uterus and to bear children. Unlike other things I have written about, as a man I lack the personal experience to specifically put myself in the shoes of the women involved in a crisis where they must consider an abortion. Indeed, many women are hurt and frustrated at the arrogance of men in power to legislate on a topic that will never directly affect them. But silence is no…


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In 1964 then prime minister Harold Wilson said that a week is a long time in politics — that is still true today. British politics remains in constant flux with the Lib Dems written off as a serious political force just a week prior to the local elections and then hailed as the leading Remain party just a week after. The Brexit Party, a force for hardline pro-Brexit sentiment has also shot up in the polls in just a matter of weeks. And it was only this week that we had official confirmation that Britain will take part in the…


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I was once part of a small, but crucial group, now almost all of them have disavowed Brexit entirely

On June 23 2016 I, after hesitating in the polling booth for a bit, voted for Britain to leave the European Union. That immediate vote was incredibly difficult for me to actually cast despite the fact that I had (from quite early on) spearheaded a local effort on behalf of a Leave vote on my university campus. However, I had purposefully deviated from the messages being delivered by Vote Leave and Leave.EU, arguing for Brexit on much softer, liberal and gradualist grounds than the main campaign.

There were many like me, according to some estimates approximately 20% of all Leave…

Ricardo Teixeira-Mendes

I talk about politics on here

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